Allerlei - Stonehenge

stonehenge

"On the Salisbury-plain is to be seen that remarkable monument of antiquity, called the Stone-henge, in Latin Mons Ambrosii. It consists of three rows of prodigious stones, some of them twenty-eight feet high, and seven broad, with others laid across on the top, and framed into them. According to Camden, these stones are artificial, and were made upon the spot. He says, the ancients had the art of making stones with sand and a strong sort of lime. And that which makes it most possible, is the vast bigness of these stones, hardly capable of any land carriage; and that they stand upon a plain, which for some miles round scarce affords a stone, great or small."

Pinkerton ("Voyages and Travels" 1808, vol. II, p. 151-152) included this passage from the writings of a Portuguese merchant, Don Manoel Gonzales, who traveled Great Britain in the 1700's. It is now known that the stones of Stonehenge were in fact transported long distances and not 'made upon the spot'. The illustration is from the endleaf in vol. II. The illustration and text are in the public domain.

stonehenge

Photo taken in 2007 (different angle than the above drawing).