Allerlei - Modern Constellations: Crux to Lynx

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Crux

Crux, the Cross, was published by Plancius in 1598 but these southern stars were known to explorers much earlier.

Fornax

Fornax, the Furnace, was published by LaCaille in 1754. It represents a type of furnace used by scientists who needed heat for their experiments. The drawing shows a distillation apparatus sitting atop a furnace.

Horologium

Horologium,the Pendulum Clock, honors the instrument used to time scientific experiments. This constellation was published by LaCaille in 1754.

Indus

Indus, the Indian, was published in 1598 from the work of Plancius and Keyser. It honors native populations that explorers encountered.

Leo Minor

Leo Minor, the Little Lion, was published by Hevelius in 1690.

Dorado

Dorado, the Dorado, represents the colorful ocean fish of the same name that seafaring explorers encountered. Plancius and Keyser were responsible for this 1598 constellation. Burritt chose to illustrate this constellation as a swordfish.

Grus

Grus, the Crane, was the work of Plancius and Keyser. It was published in 1598.

Hydrus

Hydrus, the Water Snake, is a constellation in the far southern sky. It was published by Plancius in 1598 from stars plotted by Keyser (and others) a few years earlier.

Lacerta

Lacerta, the Lizard, was published by Helevius in 1690. Hevelius thought that this area of sky was so crowded with older constellations that no other creature would fit here.

Lynx

Lynx, the Lynx, was published by Hevelius in 1690. The stars of this constellation are so dim that Hevelius thought only people with very good vision ('lynx-eyed') could see it.


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